flooding 3
Before some flooding events there is usually time to erect temporary flood gates such as this one, which prevents flood water from entering into the property. Although in this case some flood water did get into the property and is being pumped out through the letterbox.
SUDS 15
A nice example of a filter strip, showing how the water gravitates from a hard surface. Underground pipework to convey surface water away to attenuation pond
SUDS 12
Example of a swale with inlet connections of traditional underground drainage protected by gabion type baskets.
SUDS 11
Construction detail of the detention basin with the raised overflow weir before discharging into the stream
SUDS 10
A nice example of a detention basin adjacent to the highway with high level weir overflow into drainage ditch
SUDS 1
A lovely example of a swale with a gravel base, designed to infiltrate, convey and clean surface water
SUDS 4
A nice example of hard and soft engineering for conveying and storing surface water
SUDS 2
A combination between traditional and green roofs. Green roofs hols the rainwater for a longer period than traditonal roofs which helps to reduce the rate the water runs off the roof decreasing flood risk
SUDS 1
A lovely example of a swale with a gravel base, designed to infiltrate, convey and clean surface water
site investigations 2
Once we excavated this test whole, we really knew that infiltration would be poor - a combination of solid clay and the ground water table - not good for infiltration
SUDS 16
Nice example of using the public open space as a way to store and mange surface water safely.

OK so you have planning and you have to comply with the Mandatory Elements of SUR 1, so what is involved?

 

A statement from the appropriately qualified professional confirming that they are  qualified in line with the Code definition. A qualified assessor must be Chartered and be a Full Member of either the ICE or CIWEM - this means that most architects cannot undertake these assessments but, crucially, Louisa does have the correct qualifications.  

AND

The appropriately qualified professional’s report containing all information necessary to demonstrate compliance with the peak rate of run-off and volume of run-off requirements. 

The report should include:

•  Areas of permeable and impermeable surfaces on the site pre- and post-development.  Where the impermeable area has increased post development the report should also include:

•  Details of the permeability characteristics of the site pre- and post-development (e.g. infiltration tests etc., where appropriate)

•  Peak rates of run-off (l/s) calculations for the 1 year and 100 year events, pre-and post-development, including an allowance for climate change over the  Information to demonstrate that the hierarchical approach to reducing the additional volume of run-off was followed

•  Information on the calculation methods used, as well as summary results

AND

A Flood Risk Assessment confirming the risk of flooding from all sources of flooding (this may be contained within the appropriately qualified professional’s report)

AND

Drawings showing the pre-development drainage for the site (natural or constructed)

AND

Drawings showing the proposed drainage solution, system failure flood flow routes, potential flood ponding levels and ground floor levels

AND

Confirmation from the appropriately qualified professional that local drainage system failure would not cause an increase in the risk of flooding within dwellings either on or off site.

Do I automatically get 2 Credits?

Not until you obtain the following:

One Credit can be awarded by ensuring that there is no discharge from the developed site for rainfall depths up to 5mm.

One Credit can be awarded for ensuring that the runoff from all of the hard surfaces receives the appropriate Level of Treatment in accordance with The SUDS Manual to minimise the risk of pollution. 

Recent Case Study

Case Study 1
Case Study 2
Case Study 3